METHOD

If you do not have background knowledge in astrophysics we strongly suggest you to visit the basics sections where the key concepts behind the procedure are written in detail.

Step by step

Instructions For Windows

One time installations

First you have to install Python. Go to Python main page and download the desired version. We suggest Python 3.7.

Python 3.7 requires a standalone version of Visual C++ 14.2 compiler.

Go to:

https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/downloads/#build-tools-for-visual-studio-2019,

in Build tools, install C++ build tools and ensure the latest versions of MSVCv142 – VS 2019 C++ x64/x86 build tools and Windows 10 SDK are checked.

Open a Command Prompt (cmd) window. Right-click  “as administrator” and enter the following:

python -m pip install –upgrade pip

python -m pip install –upgrade setuptools

python -m pip install wheel

(The setuptools Python package version must be at least 34.4.0.)

After that you can install the planet-hunting scientific programs:

python -m pip install lightkurve

python -m pip install ktransit

 

Now you are ready to search for exoplanets!

Light Curve Analysis

Right-click Command Prompt icon “as administrator” and open a Command Prompt (cmd) window. Go to the python directory (where you have installed python) and type:         python

to open a python prompt >>>

Then type:

>>> import lightkurve as lk

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Now, let’s see one example. Say that you want to download the light curve of TIC 130814025, a star observed by the TESS Space Telescope. Type:

>>>lc = lk.search_lightcurvefile(“TIC 130814025″).download().PDCSAP_FLUX

Now you have downloaded your first light curve from TESS!!

If you want to see your amazing light curve, type:

>>> lc.scatter()

>>>plt.show()

If there are more than one data files (that is, there are observations from more than one sectors) then you use the download_all() command:

>>> lc = lk.search_lightcurvefile(“TIC130814025”).download_all().PDCSAP_FLUX

>>> lc1=lc.stitch()

Then you continue as follows:

lc2=lc.remove_nans().remove_outliers().normalize().flatten(window_length=401)

OR  lc2=lc1.remove_nans().remove_outliers().normalize().flatten(window_length=401)  // in case you have more than one files

lc3=lc2.to_corrector(“sff”).correct(windows=20)

lc3.to_csv(‘C:\tessfiles\lc3’)   //You can use this command to save the folded lightcurve to a csv file for further analysis with pltrack1 or other programs

planet=lc3.fold(period=1.30488).bin(binsize=50)

planet.scatter()

plt.show()

 

 

Soon enough we will provide detailed instructions so that you can analyse data from the TESS Telescope in Linux and MACOS.

Also, we will provide code we have written in the past with which you can analyse data from the historic Keppler Telescope.

Instructions For linux (Very similar for MACOS)

One time installations

Open a Command Prompt (cmd) window (ctrl+T) and type the following:

python -m pip install –upgrade pip

python -m pip install –upgrade setuptools

python -m pip install wheel



After that you can install the planet-hunting scientific programs entering these lines:

python -m pip install lightkurve

python -m pip install ktransit

Now you are ready to search for exoplanets!


Light Curve Analysis

Create a “.py” file in which you will insert the bold lines shown below. After that you open the terminal and visit the directory of the file you created. You run the python code using the python3 command (for example: python3 exampleFile.py).

import lightkurve as lk

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Now, let’s see one example. Say that you want to download the light curve of TIC 130814025, a star observed by the TESS Space Telescope. Type:

lc = lk.search_lightcurvefile(“TIC 130814025″).download().PDCSAP_FLUX

Now you have downloaded your first light curve from TESS!!

If you want to see your amazing light curve, type:

lc.scatter()

plt.show()




An alternative to the above procedure:

If there are more than one data files (that is, there are observations from more than one sectors) then you use the download_all() command:

lc = lk.search_lightcurvefile(“TIC130814025”).download_all().PDCSAP_FLUX

lc1=lc.stitch()

Then you continue as follows:

lc2=lc.remove_nans().remove_outliers().normalize().flatten(window_length=401)

OR  lc2=lc1.remove_nans().remove_outliers().normalize().flatten(window_length=401)  # in case you have more than one files

lc3=lc2.to_corrector(“sff”).correct(windows=20)

lc3.to_csv(‘C:\tessfiles\lc3’)   #You can use this command to save the folded lightcurve to a csv file for further analysis with pltrack1 or other programs

planet=lc3.fold(period=1.30488).bin(binsize=50)

planet.scatter()

plt.show()



The type of the graphs expected are like the ones shown above.